Friday, October 20, 2017

It’s official: Memorial part of state Veterans Services

Governor Susana Martinez joined state and local leaders to kick off the Fourth of July holiday with veterans in a ceremony transferring Vietnam Veterans...

History: Dahl helped improve life for enemy POWs

From the May 24, 2001 Sangre de Cristo Chronicle By Jessica Johnson It was 1972 and Lt. Col. John Dahl was stationed at Fort Monroe,...

Area Veterans served with pride

By Michael Ritterhouse and Gabriel Weinstein Tuesday (Nov. 11), our country will come together to honor our nation’s veterans. Here in Northern New Mexico, every...

Remembering September 11, 2001: Enchanted Circle veterans’ memories

ANGEL FIRE— Angel Fire Village Manager M. Jay Mitchell felt a rumble in the Pentagon at 9:38 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001. A slight shake. Dust began to seep from the ceiling. Evacuation and alarm notices blared.

Chavez remembered as humble veteran and proud father

CIMARRON—If you spoke with Bernardino “Nino” Chavez you would not guess the longtime Cimarron resident had earned a Bronze Star, Purple Heart and participated in the D-Day Invasion on June 6, 1944.

Living in Eagle Nest helps veterans adjust to civilian life

EAGLE NEST— Lisa Sparks almost left Eagle Nest. Sparks put her house up for sale after her first winter in the village. She thought the cold weather wasn’t for her. But she decided to stay.  Two years later, the Army veteran cannot think of a better place to live for someone with post-traumatic stress disorder. 

WWII veteran Sewell saw action — in a post office

RED RIVER — Dan Sewell, who recently celebrated his 89th birthday on May 12, is proud to be a veteran but admitted with a laugh, “I had the least exciting military career imaginable.”

Community support helps Korean War veteran thrive

By Gabriel Weinstein, Staff Writer Enrique “Henry” Cruz loves to chat. Cruz honed his conversational skills in the Marine Corps from 1953-1955. He reported to...

Memorial Day speaker Galloway: ‘War correspondents are witnesses’

ANGEL FIRE — War correspondents are sometimes lost to history. Perhaps their name becomes nothing more than a forgotten byline on a forgotten news story. Perhaps, like so many of their brethren, they die alongside the soldiers whose stories they came to tell.